Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement. A General, Political, Legal, and Legislative History from 1774, to 1881.
Robinson, Harriet H[anson].

Boston: Roberts Beothers, 1881. First edition. Slight wear to corners and spine extremities, a few small tears and minor fraying to head and tail of spine, a bit of soiling and toning to cloth, gentle lean to spine. Contemporary ink inscription on front flyleaf. A very good copy. Publisher’s brown cloth, ruled in black with black foliage pattern on front cover and spine, spine lettered in gilt, green floral patterned endpapers. Octavo. xi, [1], [7]-265 pp (Item ID: 16621)

$750.00

Harriet Jane Hanson Robinson (1825-1911) was a women’s rights advocate, abolitionist, the wife of anti-slavery and pro-labor newspaper editor William Robinson, and “mill girl.” From the age of ten and until she was twenty-three, she worked in the mills, an experience she wrote about in Loom and Spindle, or Life Among The Early Mill Girls (1898). Robinson joined Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton in the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1881. Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement was written because “Without an authentic record...the coming generation might...forget its early workers” (p. x). Her “sources of information have been carefully preserved reports of meetings; legislative documents and records; ‘Warrington’s’ letters and writings in the Springfield Republican, New York Tribune, and other newspapers; letters from friends of the cause from all parts of the country, and the personal reminiscences of old-time workers” (pp. x-xi).

In her introduction, the author gives thanks to Louisa May Alcott, Samuel E. Sewell, Franklin B. Sanborn, and Wendell Phillips

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