Scotsman's Dream.
Berry, Warner Bott.

San Francisco: Privately Printed, 2002. One of an edition of 1,000 copies. Designed and produced under the direction of Andrew Hoyem with the assistance of Blake Riley at the Arion Press in San Francisco. Signed and numbered in green ink on the colophon by the author. Frontispiece by Andrew Berry; eighteen golf hole drawings by Christopher Monti and Andrew Berry; Front end papers illustrated with MacKenzie Map by Christopher Monti; Rear endpaper illustrated with Golf Course Map by Darryl T. Roberson and Christopher Monti. Initial letters. A fine copy in a lightly rubbed green cloth slipcase with a printed paper spine label. Green, black, and yellow plaid cloth. Large octavo. [6], 527, [1, blank], [+ (Item ID: 16295)

$250.00

Berry's Scotsman's Dream is a work of fiction set initially in 1933. A general synopsis is as follows: three men, A.W. Tillinghast, Alister MacKenzie, and Donald Ross, considered to be the three greatest golf course architects in history, agree to design a golf course for the future, which will be revealed and made public in the year 2000; the golf course they jointly created will then be built and opened for play. They proceed to spend a week on the land, which Tillinghast claims is "the most perfect place I have ever seen for a golf course." It is, in actuality, a farm overlooking Cayuga Lake, near Ithaca, New York, in the fabled Finger Lakes region.

On that site the architects envision and design a classic golfing ground where future champions will play for national championships in the twenty-first century. The land is owned by a wealthy Scotsman, who underwrites the costs of the project. He is a native of St. Andrews and of the Old Course and dreams of furthering his heritage by establishing an American St. Andrews on his property. The Scotsman keeps the design plan secret for sixty-six years, all the while scrupulously preparing his land for its ultimate destiny. The secret is known to only a few persons, and all three architects go to their graves preserving it. Tillinghast, MacKenzie, and Ross believe their achievement will prove to the golfing world of the millennium that classic designs always yield classic courses, regardless of when they are built

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