The Art of Intaglio Produced on a Letterpress. With a Collection of Twelve Prints of 18th Century London Tradesmen’s Cards.
Morris, Henry.

Newtown, PA: Bird & Bull Press. 2010. One of 115 copies Twelve engraved plates of tradesman’s cards, plus numerous other illustrations, including engravings, mounted color, and mounted black and white illustrations. Title in black and red. Bound dos-~a-dos at the end is a 12-page piece by Morris entitled, “Schlocker & the Fishes.” It contains two full-page engravings, a decorative initial letter, and a title-page ornament in green. Printed on Arches & Somerset Papers. As new in matching slipcase. With original prospectus. Quarter black morocco over gray silk boards, gilt red morocco spine label. Octavo. (Item ID: 15877)

$600.00

"I had been told that intaglio could not be printed satisfactorily on a letterpress, which is generally true. But in 2009 I tried my hand, printing two intaglio plates successfully by letterpress, albeit not very large ones. In this new book I have printed by letterpress, twelve intaglio plates, some as large as 5" x 6.5". These images were made from Ambrose Heal's privately published 1925 London Tradesmen's Cards of the Eighteenth Century, which showed 101 collotype prints of old engravings advertising the wares, goods and services offered about 250 years ago. I have been attracted to these "cards"-they are really papers of differing sizes-ever since I got Heal's book fifteen years ago. Thanks to my recent introduction to intaglio, I have returned twelve of these prints to their original 18th century state: you can run your finger over the print and feel the image. Students and collectors of ephemera are acquainted with these cards, but for those who are not, some of Heal's comments may enlighten: .To anyone with a liking for old things the Trade Card must make an irresistible appeal. It is so convincingly of its own time. .The old signs that hung over the ship doors and are reproduced on the Traders' Cards are of great antiquity and interest. The names of the old streets, many of which have long since been swept away, such as 'Knaves' Acre,' 'Rosemary Lane,' 'Wendegaynlane,' take one's imagination quite apart from their historical or topographical connections. .The lettering is invariably well drawn and well spaced and the designing of the devices, if sometimes crude, is always direct and interesting. They reflect the art of the engraver through two centuries…"

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