Practical Life; or, Ways and Means for Developing Character and Resources. The Individual Considered in Regard to Domestic Life, Common Sense, Physical Culture, Education, Social Relations, Trades, Clubs, Business, Books, Dress, Love, Manners, Flirtations
Wright, Julia McNair.

Philadelphia: Published by J. C. McCurdy & Co., [1881[. First edition of this practical guide for women entering married life. Chapter titles include “Education and How to Acquire It,” “On the Cultivation of Common Sense,” “On Propriety and Elegance in Dress,” “Of Divorce and Five color plates, including page for presentation. Decorative initial letters, head-bands and tail-pieces. Front hinge cracking, top corner of front free endpaper cut away. Bottom corners lightly worn, light rubbing to other extremities. A good, clean copy. Light green cloth, decoratively stamped in black and gilt. Large octavo. 612 pp. (Item ID: 15135)

$150.00

Julia McNair Wright (1840-1903) came from an upper middle class family and received a private education. Born in Oswego, New York, she married a clergyman at nineteen, and together they spent time in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Vermont and New Jersey. Her husband ultimately became professor of mathematics and then vice president at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. Her papers are there, and at Fulton Public Library in Missouri. She wrote dozens of books on a variety of subjects, mostly aimed at a female audience, including novels, short stories, poems, histories, cookbooks, religious tracts, moral lessons on temperance, and scientific works on botany. Many books were published by the Presbyterian Board of Publication or the National Temperance Society. Her works are often concerned with morality, displaying her Protestant middle-class background. She never embraced the woman’s suffrage movement. She was extremely popular in her time.

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