An Introduction to Logic, Designed for the Use of Younger Students. Oxford: John Henry Parker, 1840.
Woolley, John.

Oxford: John Henry Parker, 1840. First editions of two scarce nineteenth-century logic books. Binding extremities rubbed. Contemporary ink inscription on title of first work (H. Hull fr. J.E. mdcccxlviii”). Ownership signature on a preliminary leaf of the second work (“W.W. Hull/Lincoln’s Inn”). A few neat pencil notes, and one neat ink note. Overall a very good copy. Newman, Francis W. Lectures on Logic, or on the Science of Evidence Genrally, Embracing both Demonstrative and Probable Reasonings, with the Doctrine of Causation. Delivered at Bristol College in the Year 1836. Oxford: J.H. Parker, 1838. Twelvemo. [8], 19 Twelvemo. [viii], 162, [2, blank] (Item ID: 14374)

$950.00

The first work is the scarcer of these: OCLC notes seven copies, three in North America. The author, John Woolley (1816–1866), was a scholar of University College. This, his first book, was used for instruction there for some years. In 1852 Woolley was chosen principal of the newly formed Sydney University. He arrived in Australia in June and delivered the inaugural speech on the opening of the University. Besides being principal, he was also professor of classics and logic. The second work is first book of Francis William Newman (1805-1897), brother of John Henry Newman, who taught classics at University College for many years. He was especially concerned with modernizing classical studies, desiring that his students speak Latin as a living language. Newman wrote books and articles on a wide variety of subjects. He produced mathematical treatises, dictionaries of Middle Eastern and African languages, monographs on education and on slavery, works on women’s rights and vaccination, and lectures on political economy. He produced metrical translations from the classics, including the Iliad. His miscellaneous essays were collected in several volumes before his death.

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