A Concise History of Philosophy and Philosophers.
Formey, [Johann Heinrich Samuel].

Glasgow: Printed for Robert Urie, 1767. First Scottish edition, published by Glasgow scholarly publisher, Robert Urie. The translator is Oliver Goldsmith. This translation was first published in London in 1766. Both editions are uncommon on today’s market. Joints cracking, but sound. Bookplate of the Berkeley Divinity School Library, old library pocket on rear pastedown, a little light foxing. A good copy of a scarce book. Contemporary full sheep, spine ruled in gilt with brown morocco label. Twelvemo. [2], pp. [5]-[10], [iii] (Item ID: 14310)

$750.00

Formey (1711-97) was professor of philosophy at Berlin. He published a large number of articles in the transactions of the Berlin Academy and was the author of several theological and philosophical treatises, including a compendium of the philosophy of Christian Wolff (La belle Wolfienne, 1741-53), and several books on the writings of Rousseau (L’esprit de Julie, 1762; L’Anti-Emile, 1762; Emile chrétien, 1764. Formey was a major influence on Kant. More than half of this book is dedicated to Greek and Roman philosophy; the later portion includes a brief discussion of the ideas Christian Wolff. Though less well-known than his Glasgow neighbors, Robert and Andrew Foulis, Urie (bap. 1713-1771) was another important Scottish Enlightenment publisher. His choice of titles was a bit different from that of his neighbors: “If these reflect his own taste he was a man of some culture with an inclination towards philosophy, history, and poetry, and with little of his contemporaries' interest in sermons. He published very few of the Greek and Latin classics in the original languages…perhaps, not wishing to compete with the Foulis press. The 1750s, and even more the 1760s, revealed an interest in the books of the French Enlightenment, particularly translations of the works of Voltaire: Urie published more than twenty of these, many within a year of their first translation into English. Other authors who feature prominently are Vertot, Fenelon, d'Alembert, Formey, and Rousseau” (Oxford DNB).

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