Literator Ebraeo-Chaldaeus, Plenam utriusque linguae Vet. Testam. Institutionem Harmonice ita tradens...Jena: Sumptibus Johannis Bielcrii, Bibliop., 1696. Quarto. [2], 501, [15] pp. Title in black and red with woodcut vignette. Woodcut tailpiece. Second e Interpres Ebraeo-Chaldaeus, Omnbes Utriusque Linguae Idiotismos dextere explicans…Jenae: Sumtu Joh. Bielckii, 1695.Quarto. [2], 361, [85] pp. Woodcut title-page vignette. Second edition. First published in 1694. OCLC locates two copies.
Danz, Johann

Four works by Danz, bound together in full stiff vellum, soiled with some stains. Remains of title in manuscript on spine, library numeral on a spine label but no other library markings. A little light foxing. These appear to be large paper copies (205 x 170 mm.), with very wide margins, particularly at the fore-margin. A contemporary scholar has made neat notes in the inner margins throughout the book, as well as underscored certain passages and started a table of contents in the preliminaries. The scholar has written his name and the date on a preliminary blank—“Gustave Wulfleff, Anno 1710.” The website of the Digital Library of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, which lists ministers in that area since the Reformation, includes a Gustave Wulfleff (b. 1689), who studied in Rostock in Mecklenburg in 1710 and went to Jena in 1712. [with:] Seu Paradigmata Nominum Simplicum, Ac Verborum Integra…Jena: apud Jo. Felicem. Bielckium, 1709. Quarto. [46], 119, [1, errata] pp. Third edition. OCLC lists five copies, and no other editions. [with:] Seu Manuductio viam ostendens compendiosa (Item ID: 13879)

$1,750.00

Johann Andreas Danz (1654-1727) was a German theologian and Hebraicist. He studied Hebrew under Esdras Edzardi and became professor of Oriental languages at the University of Jena, at first in the philosophical, and after 1713 in the theological faculty. He was considered the greatest Hebrew scholar among his Christian contemporaries. His several works on Hebrew grammar, including those described here, remained standard works for nearly a hundred years. (Jewish Encyclopedia).

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