Item #17697 [Three pamphlets and a typed letter from the Oregon Equal Suffrage Association.]. Women's Suffrage, Abigail Scott Duniway.
[Three pamphlets and a typed letter from the Oregon Equal Suffrage Association.]
[Three pamphlets and a typed letter from the Oregon Equal Suffrage Association.]

[Three pamphlets and a typed letter from the Oregon Equal Suffrage Association.]

[Portland, Oregon: Oregon Equal Suffrage Association, 1906.]. Letter dated May 16, 1906. These items encourage voters to support the 1906 women’s suffrage ballot measure in Oregon. Women’s suffrage appeared on the ballot in Oregon six times (in 1884, 1900, 1906, 1908, 1910, and 1912), which was more than any other state. Three pamphlets (3 x 6”), [4] pp. each; plus a typed letter (8 x 11”), [1] p. addressed to voters from Oregon Equal Suffrage Association President Abigail Scott Duniway and other Oregon suffrage leaders. Some creasing to letter, and some minor toning. Overall in fine condition. The pamphlets are as follows: “Is it Just?” (which argues that women should have the right to vote if Black men did, and cites the success of equal suffrage in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming), “Testimony from Governors of the Four States in which Women Vote,” and “Some Reasons Why Oregon Women Should Vote.”. Item #17697

According to Kimberly Jensen’s article in the Oregon Encyclopedia, the 1906 women’s suffrage effort in Oregon was well-funded and enthusiastically backed by national suffrage groups, with the NAWSA (National American Woman Suffrage Association) contributing $18,000 to the effort and NAWSA President Anna Howard Shaw making an appearance in Oregon for the campaign. “Despite all these efforts, the 1906 campaign met with defeat,” Jensen writes. “Liquor and business interests used the press, public relations, and dollars to oppose the measure.” Conflicts between Abigail Scott Duniway and suffrage leaders also jeopardized the efforts of the movement. The measure failed with forty-four percent support in 1906 and failed again in 1908 and 1910. In 1912, most Oregon women finally gained the right to vote, though first-generation Asian immigrants (both male and female) and Native women were still ineligible for citizenship and could not vote. Duniway (1834 – 1915) was a writer and suffrage leader who was mentored by Susan B. Anthony. She helped negotiate the 1890 merger of two suffrage organizations to form the NAWSA; ran a human rights newspaper, The New Northwest, for sixteen years; and saw Oregon women gain the right to vote in 1912 after decades of her efforts alongside other suffragists.

OCLC records three copies of “Testimony” (Cornell, University of Georgia, Utah State), one copy of “Some Reasons” (State Library of Oregon), and no copies of “Is it Just?”.

Price: $850.00