Item #17645 Sample catalogue of Japanese kimono and obi silks. [Japanese title:] Ran Omoteji yoseatsume-cho. Textiles, Japan.
Sample catalogue of Japanese kimono and obi silks. [Japanese title:] Ran Omoteji yoseatsume-cho.
Sample catalogue of Japanese kimono and obi silks. [Japanese title:] Ran Omoteji yoseatsume-cho.
Sample catalogue of Japanese kimono and obi silks. [Japanese title:] Ran Omoteji yoseatsume-cho.

Sample catalogue of Japanese kimono and obi silks. [Japanese title:] Ran Omoteji yoseatsume-cho.

[Kyoto: n.d., ca. 1890]. This unique draper’s showroom catalogue was compiled during the Meiji period (1868 – 1912) to display kimono and obi fabrics. These silks are beautifully decorated in classic Japanese patterns including florals and leaves, geometric designs, and images of birds, dragons, and clouds. With seventy-three mounted silk swatches, including richly embroidered and woven designs (pictorial, geometric, and patterned) in a variety of colors (red, green, blue, silver, and gold). Some of the swatches were dyed using the nagaita ch gata (rice paste resist dyeing) technique. Swatches vary in shape and size from 2 x 1 in. to 9 x 6 in. Some rubbing and wear to covers and slight foxing to a couple leaves. The swatches themselves are clean and bright. Very good. Heavy paper stock album with woven silk overlay to covers. Silk patterned with Noh mask motif in red, black, brown, and gold. Chipped gilt label with manuscript title in black. 9 x 6 in. [12] ff., including wrappers. Item #17645

The Meiji period brought rapid globalization and economic expansion to Japan. Feudalism was abolished and, within a generation, governmental reforms resulted in the establishment of an elected parliament, a surge in educational access, and the rapid growth of the industrial sector. In addition, the Japanese economy “opened” to the West again after having been closed to trade for over 250 years. One result of the government’s investment in industry and the reopening of the economy was a boom in textile manufacturing and exporting. Textile manufacturers also began displaying their work at World Expositions in the late nineteenth century, which, essentially, reintroduced the West to the art of fine Japanese textiles.

Japanese art and design fascinated buyers and artists alike, leading to the “japonisme” craze in the West. The Tate Britain website explains that “The rediscovery of Japanese art and design had an almost incalculable effect on Western art. The development of modern painting from impressionism on was profoundly affected by the flatness, brilliant colour, and high degree of stylisation, combined with realist subject matter, of Japanese woodcut prints. Design was similarly affected in as seen in the aesthetic movement and art nouveau.” James Whistler, Christopher Dresser, and William Godwin were all heavily influenced by Japanese aesthetics. Meiji Restoration and Modernization.” Asia for Educators, Columbia University (webpage).“Art Term: Japonisme.” Tate Britain (webpage).

Price: $1,500.00

See all items by ,