Item #17611 De l’influence des femmes sur la littérature française, comme protectrices des lettres et comme auteurs. Stephanie-Félicitr Genlis, Madame de.
De l’influence des femmes sur la littérature française, comme protectrices des lettres et comme auteurs...
De l’influence des femmes sur la littérature française, comme protectrices des lettres et comme auteurs...

De l’influence des femmes sur la littérature française, comme protectrices des lettres et comme auteurs...

Paris: Chez Maradan, 1811. First edition. This study of the influence of over forty French women authors begins with Radegund (ca. 520 – 587) and ends with Sophie Cottin (1770 – 1807). Some toning throughout. A very good, wide copy. Later nineteenth century quarter calf over marbled boards. Gilt spine. Marbled edges. Octavo. lx, 373 pp. Item #17611

Stéphanie-Félicité, Madame de Genlis (1746 – 1830) was a prolific author of educational works for children and romance novels. In 1772, she became a lady-in-waiting to Louise Marie Adélaïde de Bourbon, wife of the Duke’s son Philippe d’Orléans, Duke of Chartres, and began a brief affair with Chartres. She was appointed governess to his daughters in 1777 and assigned to teach his sons in 1781, an unusual decision that spoke to Genlis’ abilities as an educator. Genlis had published her first educational works, a series titled Théâtre de l’éducation (1779 – 1780), around the same time, which had been inspired by a series of theater productions she had written with Madame de Montesson (1738 – 1806). The plays starred their children and were attended by aristocrats including Diderot and d’Alembert.

Genlis also wrote the children’s works Les Annales de la vertu (1781) and Adèle et Théodore (1782), as well as the popular romance Mademoiselle de Clermont (1802). Her works were read (though not always admired) by many important woman writers including Jane Austen, Fanny Burney, and Anna Letitia Barbauld, the latter of whom favorably compared Genlis’ Adèle et Théodore to Rousseau’s Emile.

Price: $400.00