Item #17564 Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing). Friedrich. Gifts Froebel, Mabel A. Quimby.
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).
Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).

Original album with over seventy speciments from Froebel Gifts number eleven and twelve (pricking and sewing).

[n.p., New Hampshire?:]: April 1892. Friedrich Froebel (1782 - 1852), early childhood education pioneer who coined the term “kindergarten,” developed his Gifts between about 1830 and 1850. These twenty activities, which varied in complexity, were intended for young children to preteens. Many of the Gifts could be fashioned through materials available at home or in any classroom, but publishers like Milton Bradley also distributed the materials for the Gifts in kits for parents and teachers. Through the Gifts, educators were able to use the concept of “learning through play” to teach students abstract reasoning, problem-solving, other skills that would prepare them for a lifetime of creativity and independent thinking. The Gifts illustrated in this album are numbers eleven (pricking/perforation) and twelve (sewing/embroidery). Pricking involved using a needle or awl to pierce holes into paper, often on graph paper for geometric designs or on plain paper for more complex designs (like flowers, animals, and text). Embroidery was then done on the pricked sheets. The twelfth through fourteenth Gifts (sewing, paper-cutting, and paper-weaving) represent an increase in difficulty over the earlier gifts, as well as an increase in the aesthetic value of the finished products. Fifteen embroidered leaves, eight with geometric designs (over seventy specimens total) and seven with pictorial designs (flowers, animals, etc.). One leaf with additional hand coloring. Plus, seven leaves with pricked designs. With five small examples of paper weaving mounted on versos of first two leaves. Some edgewear. White endpapers with manuscript name and date. Accordion bound with cloth strips joining each leaf. Some wear to cloth strips (as usual in albums of this type) and some toning to leaves. Some offsetting from thread. With three examples of paper folding laid in. A very good example of a unique Froebel Gift sample album that includes gift eleven (pricking/perforation), which is rarely found in these albums. Brown cloth album with manuscript paper label and brown cloth ties. 9 x 10 in. [24] ff. (one blank). Item #17564

This unique album demonstrates a high skill level and advanced aesthetic sensibilities. Mabel Alice Quimby (b. 1870) was a kindergarten educator and the daughter of Rev. Dr. Silas E. Quimby, a Methodist preacher who helped re-establish the New Hampshire Conference Seminary (now the Tilton School) after a period of financial hardship in the 1870s. Mabel likely produced the present item during her own teacher training.

Price: $1,500.00