Item #17563 The Woman Who Spends: A Study of Her Economic Function. With an introduction by Ellen H. Richards, A.M. Bertha June Richardson.
The Woman Who Spends: A Study of Her Economic Function. With an introduction by Ellen H. Richards, A.M.
The Woman Who Spends: A Study of Her Economic Function. With an introduction by Ellen H. Richards, A.M.

The Woman Who Spends: A Study of Her Economic Function. With an introduction by Ellen H. Richards, A.M.

Boston: Whitcomb & Barrows, 1904. First edition. In this book on the economic state of women in America, Bertha June Richardson Lucas (1878 – 1945) analyzes the impact of education, employment, technology, and home life on financial stability and independence. Citing Mill and Ruskin, she discusses the aesthetic, social, and psychological value of women’s purchasing habits and the motivations that drive their spending. Both Lucas and Ellen Swallow Richards (1842 – 1911), who wrote the introduction, stress the personal and social responsibilities conferred on women by their increasing economic power. Slight fading to spine. Top edge gilt. Minor marginal toning. Mid-twentieth century bookplate (Hattie G. Ricker) to front pastedown. A near fine copy. Publisher’s red cloth. Octavo. 147, [2, ads] pp. Item #17563

Bertha June Richardson, a writer and lecturer, graduated from Smith College in 1901. During World War I, she spent two years doing relief work with the Red Cross in Switzerland and France, and served as the Director of Foreign Publicity for the American Red Cross. Her organizing efforts included roles in the San Francisco Emergency Peace Campaign, Pan-Pacific Women’s Association, the San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association, and other women’s and pacifist organizations. The Children of France and the Red Cross (1918) is her only other published book.

Ellen Swallow Richards was an industrial engineer, environmental chemist, and MIT instructor. In 1873, she earned her B.S. from MIT and became the first woman to receive a degree from the school. It was largely Richards’ efforts, including her establishment of a women’s lab at MIT, that led to the equal admission of women beginning in 1883. Richards also undertook the first scientific study of America’s drinking water in 1887, and her survey of 40,000 samples of Massachusetts drinking water remains a benchmark in pollution studies. Richards was a pioneer in the field of food science and home economics, and she worked to professionalize the field. In the words of Sarah Stage in the ANB, “Under Richards’s leadership home economics moved beyond emphasis on the household arts of cooking and sewing to train women in scientific principles and develop careers for college-educated women in university teaching and institutional management.”.

Price: $750.00

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