Item #17343 A book of facts about the WAC. Women's Army Corps.
A book of facts about the WAC.
A book of facts about the WAC.
A book of facts about the WAC.
A book of facts about the WAC.

A book of facts about the WAC.

[n.p. 1944]. A Women’s Army Corps recruiting booklet discussing the impact of WAC members working as mechanics, medical professionals, switchboard operators, mapmakers, cryptographers, welders, and in many more essential positions during World War II. Illustrated on nearly every page with photo reproductions of Women’s Army Corps members at work, plus two pages of illustrations showing WAC uniforms. Inside of front cover illustrated with a full-page photo reproduction of Oveta Culp Hobby, Colonel, General Staff Corps, and the Director of the WAC. Contemporary ink stamp of the US Army Recruiting Office in Dayton, Ohio, on back cover. Slight toning to edges of wrappers. A bright, near-fine copy of an uncommon item. Original color-printed paper wrappers illustrated with a woman in a WAC uniform. 5 in. x 8 in. Item #17343

“What the Wacs do — they are making a glorious war record — in all three army forces!”.

The WAC, the women’s branch of the United States Army, was established in 1943. Its predecessor was the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, which was formed in 1942 in large part through the efforts of women political figures like Eleanor Roosevelt and Congresswoman Edith Nourse Rogers. The WAAC mobilized the many women who wanted to participate directly in the war effort, and put women in Army positions both in the United States and on the front in Europe, East Asia, and North Africa. The WAAC became the WAC when the organization was converted to active-duty status. The WAC remained active through WWII and the Korean and Vietnam wars, after which women were permitted in the general ranks of the United States Army. See Yellin, Emily. Our Mother’s War, pp. 111-133.

Price: $100.00

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