Item #17291 Yes, but —. Women's heath.
Yes, but —
Yes, but —

Yes, but —

[ New York: Parenthood League, 1919 ]. First edition This treatise on the morality of birth control debunks myths and responds to anti-contraception arguments. The pamphlet discusses high infant death rates in impoverished populations with insufficient access to birth control, religions opposition to birth control, and the importance of scientists and doctors in pioneering safe new forms of contraception. Some toning to wrappers. Clean throughout aside from a few contemporary pencil annotations in the margins. A very good copy of an uncommon pamphlet. Original beige paper wrappers titled in brown. 3 x 6 in. 24 pp. Item #17291

The final argument addressed in the pamphlet reads as follows: “Yes, but somehow the whole idea [of contraception] is distasteful. I believe in it, but really I don’t think I care to be associated with an organized effort in regard to it.” To which the author responds, “are you going to let [your aversion] hold you back, when you realize how day by day the needless tragedies go on, and that just in proportion as you…shrink from responsibility, that suffering will be prolonged?” (p. 23). The Voluntary Parenthood League was founded in 1919 by activist Mary Dennett (1872 – 1947), a prominent opponent of laws against birth control who was prosecuted under the Comstock Act in 1915 for distributing an informative pamphlet on sex education. In 1925, the Voluntary Parenthood League merged with Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. The combined organizations became the Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1942.

OCLC records only six copies: New York Academy of Medicine, University of Rochester, Yale, Duke, Ohio State, and the University of Waterloo in Canada.

Price: $175.00

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