The World Unmask’d; or, the Philosopher the greatest Cheat; in Twenty-Four Dialogues Between Crito a Philosopher, Philo a Lawyer, and Erastus a Merchant. In which True Virtue is distinguished from what usually bears the Name or Resemblance of it: The many Prejudices and Mistakes in Judgement and Practice, in regard to Conscience and Religion, are examined and rectified. Marie Huber.
The World Unmask’d; or, the Philosopher the greatest Cheat; in Twenty-Four Dialogues Between Crito a Philosopher, Philo a Lawyer, and Erastus a Merchant. In which True Virtue is distinguished from what usually bears the Name or Resemblance of it: The many Prejudices and Mistakes in Judgement and Practice, in regard to Conscience and Religion, are examined and rectified..
The World Unmask’d; or, the Philosopher the greatest Cheat; in Twenty-Four Dialogues Between Crito a Philosopher, Philo a Lawyer, and Erastus a Merchant. In which True Virtue is distinguished from what usually bears the Name or Resemblance of it: The many Prejudices and Mistakes in Judgement and Practice, in regard to Conscience and Religion, are examined and rectified..
The World Unmask’d; or, the Philosopher the greatest Cheat; in Twenty-Four Dialogues Between Crito a Philosopher, Philo a Lawyer, and Erastus a Merchant. In which True Virtue is distinguished from what usually bears the Name or Resemblance of it: The many Prejudices and Mistakes in Judgement and Practice, in regard to Conscience and Religion, are examined and rectified..

The World Unmask’d; or, the Philosopher the greatest Cheat; in Twenty-Four Dialogues Between Crito a Philosopher, Philo a Lawyer, and Erastus a Merchant. In which True Virtue is distinguished from what usually bears the Name or Resemblance of it: The many Prejudices and Mistakes in Judgement and Practice, in regard to Conscience and Religion, are examined and rectified..

London: Printed for A. Millar, 1736. First edition in English. First published in French in Amsterdam in 1731. Some wear to hinges and extremities. Red speckled edges. Darkening to top edge. Light toning and dustsoiling within. A very good, crisp copy of a book that is uncommon in commerce. Contemporary speckled calf ruled in gilt. Spine with gilt and five raised bands. Light brown morocco spine label lettered in gilt. Octavo. viii, 446, [1, ads] pp. Item #17237

Marie Huber (1695 – 1753) was a theologian, translator, and editor who wrote on universalism and deism. In the Feminist Encyclopedia of French Literature (2009), Pascale Dewey wrote, “Influenced by a pietist uncle, Fatio de Duillier…[Huber] enthusiastically undertook to combat theological dogma with rare logic and common sense. She rejected predestination and sacraments, and favored an inner and more personal religion fostering mysticism and direct relation with God…Immanuel Kant may owe her more than is generally acknowledged. Forceful and unusually independent in her thinking, she is considered the forerunner of liberal Protestantism,” (p. 260).

Huber also wrote Lettres sur la religion essentielle (1738), which precedes the deism of Rousseau and which Robert Burns read in translation, and Réduction du Spectateur anglois (1753).

Price: $750.00

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