Talks to My Patients: Hints on Getting Well and Keeping Well. Rachel B. Gleason.
Talks to My Patients: Hints on Getting Well and Keeping Well.
Talks to My Patients: Hints on Getting Well and Keeping Well.
Talks to My Patients: Hints on Getting Well and Keeping Well.

Talks to My Patients: Hints on Getting Well and Keeping Well.

New York: M.L. Holbrook Co., 1895. Enlarged edition with “the addition of Nineteen ‘Letters to Ladies’ on Health, Education, Society, etc.” that were not present in any earlier editions. First published in 1870. The advertisement is for the Gleason Sanitarium, which was established in 1852 by the author and her husband. Light soiling to cloth in a few places. Front joint splitting but holding firm. A very good, clean copy of a book that is uncommon in commerce. Publisher’s light brown cloth titled in gilt. Octavo. 403, [1, ads] pp. Item #17235

Dr. Rachel Brooks Gleason, M.D. (1820 – 1905) graduated from Syracuse Medical College with her medical degree in 1851 and became the fourth woman doctor in the United States. Gleason was a practitioner of both conventional medicine and alternative treatments, and maintained an interest in holistic practices (diet, exercise, and healthy living as medicine) and pseudoscientific treatments (like “water cures”) throughout her career. In 1852, Dr. Gleason and her husband established a treatment center, the Elmira Water Cure, in New York; the center operated as the Gleason Sanitarium between 1893 and 1903 and as the Gleason Health Resort from 1904 onward.

Dr. Gleason’s combination of conventional medical treatments and holistic practices led her to great success treating women, especially pregnant women and those who had recently given birth.
She was also a dress reformer and supporter of suffrage, abolition, and free public schooling. Her success in medicine motivated many other women, like her daughter Adele and her sister Zippie Brooks Wales, to earn M.D.s and practice medicine.

Price: $750.00

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