Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]. Textiles, Dorothy Payton, Curtis Payton.
Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]
Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]
Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]
Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]
Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]
Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]

Terrace Textures. Thread Horizons Unlimited for Handweavers. [Weaving instruction and pattern book.]

[ Portland, Oregon: ]: Terrace Yarn Shop, 1949. The Terrace Yarn Shop issued the Terrace Textures guidebooks beginning in 1949. OCLC records two similar titles, a 1957 issue at the Smithsonian and an undated issue at San Francisco State, and a series of issues (1949 – 1954) at Surrey Public Library in BC, Canada. With twenty textile samples including linen, cotton, and wool. Also with two full-page charts. Disbound, as issued. All enclosed in a contemporary blue cloth three-ring binder (9 ” x 11 ”) from the library of Marilyn Beach Bishop (b. 1922). Some discoloration to cloth. Toning to graph paper. Very good. [Together with:] [Beach, Marilyn]. [Original weaving manuscript with samples.] [Portland, Oregon: ca. 1940-1947.] 8 in. x 10 in. [50] pp. With thirty-one original weaving samples. Pencil manuscript text on graph paper. 8 in. x 11 in. 30 pp. Item #17190

The shop was founded in Portland, Oregon near the end of World War II by Dorothy Payton (1908 – 1998) and Curtis Payton (1906 – 1983). Their large shop sold thousands of fabrics, yarns, design books, manuals, and looms. Dorothy Payton developed and sold their own small loom that was sized to fit into apartments, schools, and other small spaces, and could be used to create smaller pieces like afghans and small rugs.

The manuscript and samples by Marilyn Beach Bishop were influenced by Mary Meigs Atwater (1878 – 1956), who revived handweaving in the United States beginning in the 1920s. Bishop had taken a correspondence course by Atwater. Bishop was also a culinary and weaving enthusiast who, in 1956, married William Bishop (b. 1922), whose family owned and operated Pendleton Woolen Mills. See Weaving a Spell.” The Oregonian, Oct. 10, 1964.

Price: $750.00