History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! 8th March, 1857, and of Miss Abigail Gardiner’s Three Months Captivity Among the Indians. According to her own account, as given to L[orenzo] P[orter] Lee. Abigail Gardner-Sharpe.
History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! 8th March, 1857, and of Miss Abigail Gardiner’s Three Months Captivity Among the Indians. According to her own account, as given to L[orenzo] P[orter] Lee.
History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! 8th March, 1857, and of Miss Abigail Gardiner’s Three Months Captivity Among the Indians. According to her own account, as given to L[orenzo] P[orter] Lee.
History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! 8th March, 1857, and of Miss Abigail Gardiner’s Three Months Captivity Among the Indians. According to her own account, as given to L[orenzo] P[orter] Lee.

History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! 8th March, 1857, and of Miss Abigail Gardiner’s Three Months Captivity Among the Indians. According to her own account, as given to L[orenzo] P[orter] Lee.

New Britain, CT: L.P. Lee, 1857. First edition. With six engraved vignettes illustrating Gardiner’s experiences. Some dustsoiling and toning. A very good copy of a fragile item. Original buff paper wrappers printed in black with a vignette of Gardiner. 5 in. x 9 in. 48 pp. Item #17124

Abigail Gardner-Sharpe (1843 – 1921) was taken captive during a raid on her community in Spirit Lake, Iowa at the age of thirteen. The raid, which became known as the Spirit Lake Massacre, was led by the Wahpekute leader Inkpaduta in retaliation for the brutality of settlers against his own community during an unusually harsh winter. Inkpaduta’s band captured Gardner-Sharpe and took her to a pipestone quarry in the Dakota Territory, where she observed the band crafting pipes. Gardner-Sharpe was eventually recovered by scouts sent from South Dakota. She lived the rest of her life in Iowa, where she established her family’s land as a tourist attraction. The present work is one entry in the extremely popular drama of white captivity narratives. In these stories, many of which were pure fiction passed off as memoir, white women were abducted from settlements in the west by Native men, who held them captive, brutalized them, and sometimes forced them to marry. Gardner-Sharpe’s memoir recounts her real experiences, but was, nevertheless, another product of a genre animated by white people’s fears about Native brutality (and brutal sexuality) as more and more settlers encroached on Native land.

Ayer 181. Graff 2442. Howes L210. National Park Service website. “Abigail Gardner Sharpe (Pipestone National Monument)." Also see: Namias, June. White Captives: Gender and Ethnicity on the American Frontier (1993).

Price: $450.00

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