Margaret and Her Friends or Ten Conversations with Margaret Fuller upon the Mythology of the Greeks and its Expression in Art. Held at the House of the Rev. George Ripley, Bedford Place. Boston Beginning March 1, 1841. Reported by Caroline W. Healey. Caroline Healy Dall.
Margaret and Her Friends or Ten Conversations with Margaret Fuller upon the Mythology of the Greeks and its Expression in Art. Held at the House of the Rev. George Ripley, Bedford Place. Boston Beginning March 1, 1841. Reported by Caroline W. Healey.
Margaret and Her Friends or Ten Conversations with Margaret Fuller upon the Mythology of the Greeks and its Expression in Art. Held at the House of the Rev. George Ripley, Bedford Place. Boston Beginning March 1, 1841. Reported by Caroline W. Healey.
Margaret and Her Friends or Ten Conversations with Margaret Fuller upon the Mythology of the Greeks and its Expression in Art. Held at the House of the Rev. George Ripley, Bedford Place. Boston Beginning March 1, 1841. Reported by Caroline W. Healey.

Margaret and Her Friends or Ten Conversations with Margaret Fuller upon the Mythology of the Greeks and its Expression in Art. Held at the House of the Rev. George Ripley, Bedford Place. Boston Beginning March 1, 1841. Reported by Caroline W. Healey.

Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1905/. First edition. In the preface, Dall writes that the present work was the only published record of Fuller’s “conversations” at the time. Smudge to back cover and light rubbing to extremities. Minor foxing to edges and endpapers. A very good, clean, and tight copy. Publisher’s olive-green cloth stamped in gilt. Octavo. [2], 162 pp. Item #17113

Margaret Fuller (1810 – 1850) was a Transcendentalist writer and the author of Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1845), which is considered the first major feminist work written in America. In 1840, she took the helm of The Dial, the new Transcendentalist quarterly; a month later, she began hosting her “conversations,” during which Boston intellectuals, mostly women, joined to discuss literature, art, philosophy, abolitionism, and women’s rights. The conversations took place at the home of Elizabeth Palmer Peabody and were attended by women like Maria White Lowell, Caroline Sturgis, Lydia Maria Child, Julia Ward Howe, Sophia Dana Ripley, and many others. Mary Channing, cousin of William Henry Channing, and Sarah Clarke, wife of James Freeman Clarke, also attended. See American National Biography.

Caroline Wells Healey Dall (1822 – 1912) was an early follower of Fuller and a member of her literary circle. Dall went on to produce her own feminist works such as Woman’s Right to Labor (1860) and The College, the Market, and the Court: or, Woman’s Relation to Education, Labor, and Law (1867). The latter work, which were based on a series of lectures she delivered in Boston between 1859 and 1861, was her most important. She used a social-scientific mode of analysis to argue for coeducation, economic opportunity, and equality under the law. Dall was also a founding member of the American Social Science Association in 1865 and served on its executive committee until 1905.
BAL 6510.

Price: $600.00

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