Home & State. Being an address delivered at Stockholm at the Sixth Convention of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance. Selma Lagerlof.
Home & State. Being an address delivered at Stockholm at the Sixth Convention of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance...
Home & State. Being an address delivered at Stockholm at the Sixth Convention of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance...
Home & State. Being an address delivered at Stockholm at the Sixth Convention of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance...
Home & State. Being an address delivered at Stockholm at the Sixth Convention of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance...

Home & State. Being an address delivered at Stockholm at the Sixth Convention of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance...

London: Published by the International Woman Suffrage Alliance, [1912]. First edition. Translated by Catherine Ursula Holmstedt, née Gittins. Light dustsoiling and toning to wrappers. With three contemporary materials laid in: an October 1912 letter (4 pp.) from a suffragist named Ailsa to her mother, which Ailsa sent along with the Lagerlöf pamphlet; another October 1912 letter from Ailsa to a male friend or relative (4 pp.); and an announcement (1 p.) for a 1912-13 YMCA subscription lecture series. A very good, clean copy of a scarce item with relevant contemporary material enclosed. Original paper wrappers with sepia portrait of Selma Lagerlöf. 5 in. x 11 in. 11 pp. Item #17076

“The following pages contain a translation of the address given by Miss Lagerlöf at the Opera House in Stockholm, on the occasion of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance Congress in that city, in June, 1911. It was prefaced by an introduction explaining that as it was the first time she had undertaken to speak in the public on the question of Women’s Suffrage, she felt obliged to consider carefully the grounds for her belief in its necessity, but that when she examined the old arguments on which she expected to rely, she felt they were not sufficient for her purpose. All were open to more or less cogent counter arguments, so she set herself to find reasons that should be unanswerable. How far she has succeeded in this it is left for the reader to decide,” (p. 2). Selma Lagerlöf (1858 – 1940) was a Swedish educator, author, and suffragist who became the first woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1909, for the “lofty idealism, vivid imagination and spiritual perception that characterize her writings,” (Nobel Foundation website). She was also the first woman to be granted membership in the Swedish Academy.

The lecture announcement and letters from Ailsa indicate that she attended a lecture by a Miss Granfeldt, a Finnish student of Lagerlöf, at the Sunderland YMCA. OCLC records four copies of this edition: University of Leicester, National Library of Scotland, NYPL, and Harvard.

Price: $150.00

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