Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649. Joseph Crawhall, William Grey.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.
Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.

Chorographia, or A Survey of Newcastle upon Tyne: 1649.

Newcastle upon Tyne: Andrew Reid, 1884. First edition. William Grey, a topographer and burgess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, was the first to publish an account of his native town. He is known only for that account (featured here). With hundreds of charming woodcuts by Joseph Crawhall. The subjects include bridges, coats-of-arms, nature, and portraits of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Boards somewhat rubbed and toned. Twentieth century bookplate to front pastedown. Offsetting from bookplate onto flyleaf. A very good, overall clean copy of a scarce book. Half vellum over gray paper boards. Spine stamped in black and covers stamped in red and black. Quarto. 124 pp. Item #17033

Joseph Crawhall II (1821 – 1896) was a wood engraver from Newcastle, England whose humorous artwork often parodied and honored the culture of his home city. He began his career in illustration in 1859 with The Compleatest Angling Booke and went on to illustrate over two dozen books over the next thirty years, five of which were printed by the Leandenhall Press. Crawhall also wrote and illustrated for Punch between 1873 and 1890. Though his work often went uncredited, Felver describes his artistic contributions to Punch as “comic drawings of genius” (p. 29). Joseph Crawhall II (1821 – 1896) was a wood engraver from Newcastle, England whose humorous artwork often parodied and honored the culture of his home city. He began his career in illustration in 1859 with The Compleatest Angling Booke and went on to illustrate over two dozen books over the next thirty years, five of which were printed by the Leandenhall Press. Crawhall also wrote and illustrated for Punch between 1873 and 1890. Though his work often went uncredited, Felver describes his artistic contributions to Punch as “comic drawings of genius” (p. 29).

Crawhall was also the father of Joseph Crawhall III (1861 – 1913), an important artist in the Glasgow school of painters who dubbed themselves the “Glasgow Boys.” The group was active largely between 1875 and 1895 (Oxford DNB).

Price: $600.00

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