Little Rhymes for Little Folks. [cover title: Little Rhymes for Little Folks, or Poetry for Fanny’s Library.] By a Lady, Author of “Cato,” “Infant’s Friend,” & c. Hannah? Glasse.
Little Rhymes for Little Folks. [cover title: Little Rhymes for Little Folks, or Poetry for Fanny’s Library.] By a Lady, Author of “Cato,” “Infant’s Friend,” & c.
Little Rhymes for Little Folks. [cover title: Little Rhymes for Little Folks, or Poetry for Fanny’s Library.] By a Lady, Author of “Cato,” “Infant’s Friend,” & c.
Little Rhymes for Little Folks. [cover title: Little Rhymes for Little Folks, or Poetry for Fanny’s Library.] By a Lady, Author of “Cato,” “Infant’s Friend,” & c.

Little Rhymes for Little Folks. [cover title: Little Rhymes for Little Folks, or Poetry for Fanny’s Library.] By a Lady, Author of “Cato,” “Infant’s Friend,” & c.

London: John Harris, [n.d.., ca. 1823]. The text on the printed wrappers identifies this item as the second edition, though there is no edition statement on the title-page. OCLC provides the publication date of 1823, though a date is not specified in this item itself. With a hand-colored, half-page woodcut illustration to accompany each of the 16 poems. Creasing and soiling to wrappers. Some toning to edges throughout, but the pages and illustrations are very clean and bright overall. A very good copy of a scarce, fragile item. Publisher’s printed stiff paper wrappers, once pink but faded. Twelvemo. 18 leaves. Item #16815

Many entries on OCLC credit Little Rhymes for Little Folks, as well as the other John Harris tracts Cato (ca. 1816) and The Infant’s Friend (ca. 1819), to English cookbook writer and dressmaker Hannah Glasse (1708–1770). Glasse’s first publication was the extremely popular cookbook The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy (1747), which was one of the bestselling cookbooks in English in the mid-eighteenth century. However, the Oxford DNB does not make any mention of Glasse publishing books for children, and we do not have enough information to confidently state that Glasse was the author of Little Rhymes for Little Folks. If the John Harris editions of these tracts were indeed written by Glasse, they were published some fifty years after her death, which is certainly uncommon and implies some unusual circumstances.

Only one other contemporary copy of the item with the subtitle “Poetry for Fanny’s Library” is listed on OCLC (at the National Art Library in the United Kingdom). OCLC also lists 6 copies of a variant with the subtitle “A Present for Fanny’s Library” and 2 copies with no subtitle specified.

Price: $850.00

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