The Motor Diary of a Modern Woman.” [With:]“Travel in Comfort.”
The Motor Diary of a Modern Woman.” [With:]“Travel in Comfort.”
The Motor Diary of a Modern Woman.” [With:]“Travel in Comfort.”

The Motor Diary of a Modern Woman.” [With:]“Travel in Comfort.”

[Detroit:]: Lincoln Motor Co., Ford Motor Co., April 1940.]. First edition of “Motor Diary” and probably the first edition of “Travel in Comfort.” Dates from codes in the bottom corners of back covers: 12-39 for “Motor Diary,” which corresponds with the December 1939 unveiling of the Lincoln Zephyr Line; and 4-40 for “Travel in Comfort.”. Both of these car dealership showroom brochures advertise V-12 Lincoln Zephyr luxury cars to women. A bit of light wear to the back of “Travel in Comfort” and two small strips of toning at spine fold of “Motor Diary.” Still a bright, near-fine set. Flexible glossy card paper wrappers and leaves. Two brochures, quarto (8 ” by 11”). 8] pp. Item #16772

Both of these brochures focus on the luxury, comfort, and practicality of the Lincoln Zephyr line. Both brochures feature stylish women taking to the roads, though “Motor Diary” focuses on an independent woman exploring alone and the other shows a woman on a road trip with her family.

In “Femininity and the Electric Car,” Virginia Scharff explains that car companies marketed gas cars toward men and electric cars toward women until about 1915. “Women were presumed to be too weak, timid, and fastidious to want to drive noisy, smelly gasoline-powered cars,” Scharff writes. As the 1920s approached, however, more women sought out gas cars, which were better at handling rough roads, long distances, and high speeds than electrics and ended up being far more practical. Scharff also quotes a 1915 magazine article, which reads: “Starting a few years go with a little timid venturing on the boulevards in their electrics, women have gradually conquered the motorcar…Their fear of gasoline and monkey wrenches has vanished.”.

Price: $375.00